I think my assessment is out of line with my neighbor’s property, whose property is assessed lower. What do I do if I want my assessment to be as low as theirs?
The first step in comparing properties is to examine the factual components of each property. Many times properties that appear larger are in fact much smaller than people think. Quality characteristics should also be examined when making comparisons. Ultimately, the assessors have to determine if the assessment represents market value on the subject property and also if the assessed value on the neighbor’s property represents market value.

If a neighboring property is too low in relation to surrounding properties, the assessors cannot compound their low assessment by also lowering surrounding properties. The resolution may be that the assessors have to raise the neighboring property’s assessed value to make it more in line with the surrounding properties. The most important criterion the assessors examine in an abatement request is the market value of the property of the person filing the abatement and the market value of any property that the person filing the abatement mentions on the application.

Show All Answers

1. Where can I find the detail on my property?
2. What do the assessors look at when determining an assessment?
3. How do I know if my valuation is fair and equitable?
4. How can my assessed value increase (or decrease) when I did not do anything to the property in 5 years and I am not selling the property?
5. What will happen if I put an addition on my property? Are the actual construction costs of a new home used to determine the new assessment?
6. Why did my valuation change from the prior year’s valuation more (or less) than my neighbor’s?
7. I think my assessment is out of line with my neighbor’s property, whose property is assessed lower. What do I do if I want my assessment to be as low as theirs?
8. I recently purchased my home for a price which is different than the valuation for this year. How is this possible?